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New Sony Reader (PRS-505) Now Available

October 2, 2007

A few weeks after initial details of an upgraded Sony Reader leaked out, the new unit is officially available.

Since my first report, a few additional improvements have been revealed, most notably an improved display with better contrast, faster page turns and more shades of gray.

Overall, the changes are nice incremental improvements, but nothing revolutionary. See the diagram below for a comparison of the new model (PRS-505) versus the original (PRS-500).

Sony Readers compared

Additional details are available at the MobileRead Forum.

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6 comments

  1. […] Matt wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptA few weeks after initial details of an upgraded Sony Reader leaked out, the new unit is officially available. Since my first report, a few additional improvements have been revealed, most notably an improved display with better … […]


  2. hi
    I wana bye a reader. my most need is to read articles in pdf formats. usually articles from ieee or other sites like that. which reader do you suggest for me?


  3. There aren’t any ideal readers out there yet, and the choice among those that are available depends on your specific needs. If flexibility is important but cost, size and weight are not, then a tablet PC or slate like the Lenovo X61T might be a good choice for you.

    A dedicated reader like the Sony is limited in function and has some limitations when reading PDF — test your PDFs on its screen if you can, preferably in landscape orientation to see if it works for you. The Sony Reader is compact, has long battery life and has a beautiful screen (though its only good for black and white documents and you have to read it in good ambient light). You might be able to get it at a good price (~$49 USD) if you qualify for some of Sony’s special offers. A dedicated unit like the Iliad has a bigger screen and thus has fewer problems with PDF, and it can also be used to surf the web via wi-fi, but it costs significantly more.

    An iPhone is great if you don’t mind a smallish screen, are reading relatively short documents (since it has no bookmarking), and you have Internet access readily available You would need to read your PDFs from an online service like Readdle so you can read it from the iPhone’s web browser, or email your PDF to yourself so you can read it from the Mail program.


  4. My Sony 505 e-book reader fell on the floor within the first month and disrupted the display. Sony’s web-site said it was covereed by the gaurentee. I shipped it back and they want $270 to replace the screen. I am not pleased and do not reccomend that product.


  5. Whilst I can see the benefits of having an eBook Reader, and the Sony Reader PRS-505 is certainly a good example, surely having an integrated device is the way forward so that phone, camera etc are all in the one unit?


  6. I tend to agree, if for no other reason that I would also carry such a device whereas a dedicated reader would tend to be left at home. Which is exactly how it turns out for me — I carry my iPhone everywhere, and it’s always ready. The Sony Reader winds up being left behind most of the time, the victim of an already-too-full briefcase.



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